Our Team


Richard Davey

CPA, CFP®

Biography

He became a CPA and joined Grant Thornton as a Senior Assurance Associate where he audited nearly all areas of GAAP financial statements for major public and private corporations. During this time, he also took graduate courses in taxation at Golden Gate University in San Francisco.

While accounting and tax offered many rewarding challenges and helped build a solid foundation for understanding how businesses work, reviewing past results wasn’t his lifelong dream. He realized he preferred focusing more on forward looking projects and practices serving families rather than large corporations.

Because of this, he made a career change to investment advising and financial planning starting out at the mid-west brokerage firm – Waddell & Reed. Working for a large national firm was a great place to start, in building a deep knowledge of investment and insurance products, but it didn’t take long for Richard to realize he was missing some key ingredients to be able to provide the most valuable advice: (1) Flexibility that comes from working for a smaller firm, and (2) independence; that is, having no sales incentive to use certain investment products over others. In 2014, Richard officially started building his own practice at a small independent firm in Marin County with only $3MM in assets. Just 3 years later, when Fiduciary Financial Group was started, the number had grown 10X which could be attributed to a healthy stream of referrals from happy clients and from positive investment returns.

Education

  • USD Accountancy
  • Certified Financial Planner™
  • Certified Public Accountant

Interests

  • Tennis
  • Hiking
  • College Football

Richard’s core beliefs in serving clients can be best outlined with the following rules:

  • Always tell the truth. If you do, you don’t have to remember later what you said.
  • Admit when you don’t know the answer to a problem.
  • Structure business arrangements to result in a win/win for both parties. Adversarial business arrangements are a recipe for disaster.
  • Tell people what they need to hear, not what they want to hear.
  • When you stop wanting to learn new skills in your trade, it’s time to do something new.

Richard lives in Boise, Idaho with his wife and two daughters having moved there to be closer to family. He splits time each month between Marin and Boise.